Scaling Change

Once upon a time, scaling production may have been enough to be competitive. Now, the most competitive organisations scale change to continually improve customer experience. How can we use what we’ve learned scaling production to scale change?

Metaphors for scaling
Metaphors for scaling

I recently presented a talk titled “Scaling Change”. In the talk I explore the connections between scaling production, sustaining software development, and scaling change, using metaphors, maths and management heuristics. The same model of change applies from organisational, marketing, design and technology perspectives.  How can factories, home loans and nightclubs help us to think about and manage change at scale?

Read on with the spoiler post if you’d rather get right to the heart of the talk.

Arguments with Agency

Here are slides from my talk at LASTconf 2015. The title is “Bring Your A-Game to Arguments for Change”. The premise is that there are different types of arguments, more or less suited to various organisational and delivery scenarios, and the best ones have their own agency. In these respects, you can think of them like Pokemon – able to go out and do your bidding, with the right preparation.

Change agents
Change agents

The content draws heavily from ideas shared on this blog:

Seeing Stars – Bespoke AR for Mobiles

I presented on the development of the awesome Fireballs in the Sky app (iOS and Android) at YOW! West with some great app developers. See the PDF. (NB. there were a lot of transitions)

Abstract

We’ll explore the development of the Fireballs in the Sky app, designed for citizen scientists to record sightings of meteorites (“fireballs”) in the night sky. We’ll introduce the maths for AR on a mobile device, using the various sensors, and we’ll throw in some celestial mechanics for good measure.

We’ll discuss the prototyping approach in Processing. We’ll describe the iOS implementation, including: libraries, performance tuning, and testing. We’ll then do the same for the Android implementation. Or maybe the other way around…

Playing Games is Serious Business

Simple game scenarios can produce the same outcomes as complex and large-scale business scenarios. Serious business games can therefore reduce risk and improve outcomes when launching new services. Gamification also improves alignment and engagement across organisational functions.

This is a presentation on using games to understand and improve organisational design and service delivery, which I presented at the Curtin University Festival of Teaching and Learning.

(Don’t be concerned by what looks like a bomb-disposal robot in the background.)

The slides provide guidance on applying serious business games in your context.

Data Visualisation: Good for Business

It was great to be part of the recent ThoughtWorks data visualisation event in Perth. There’s a summary on the ThoughtWorks Insights channel.

Visualisation is a topic I love talking about – especially demonstrating why it’s good for business – and presenting with Ray Grasso was a lot of fun.

Here’s the full video of the presentation.

If you want to pick and choose:

  • I start with the historical perspective and current state
  • 5.40, Ray starts the IMO story
  • 28.55, I start the call centre story
  • 41.53, Ray starts the NOPSEMA story
  • 54.39, We take questions

I’ve been talking to people about the event, and they always say something like:

“I’m such a visual person. I love it when people explain things to me visually.”

No-one ever says:

“Don’t show me a picture.”

Words are important, of course, as are other means of communicating. We all have multiple ways of processing information. However, visual processing is almost always a key component. Consider my friend the lawyer, who remembered cases because her lecturer pinned them on a map and illustrated them with holiday snap shots. I’m sure you have a similar example.

So we “see” that data visualisation is good for humans. And what’s good for humans is good for business. Key business outcomes include engaging communications, operational clarity, and unexpected insights.

Enough words. Browse the slides below or watch the presentation above.

Thanks to Diana Adorno for the feature pic.